Laurie's blog

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Sex in Videogames Conference

The Sex in Videogames conference is coming up next week. I've posted some thoughts on it on the Alt-Games blog, and there's more on the conference website, including special academic pricing. If anyone goes, I'd love to hear or read a conference report. The conference looks fabulous and it's really important for the future development of gaming, and of game studies.

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Gameology on MOG

Millions of Games (MOG) is an incredibly exciting site in its own right, but then it also also has the "gameology" for each of the games it lists--a new word is being born and this website helps to foster it!

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MySpace Commentary, Probably Same will Soon be needed for Games

There's an interview online with Henry Jenkins and Danah Boyd discussing the social function of MySpace and the problems with regulating it. MMOs have already begun to deal with this, and services like Xbox Live will result in this discussion coming up again in regards to games. This is a solid interview, and I'm (sadly) certain that it will be a needed cite in other upcoming arguments against over-regulation based on misunderstandings about technology.

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Google Notebook!

Google has released another new service, Google Notebook. While not related directly to Game Studies, the service is really awesome because it simplifies the process of taking notes online. Since the notes are sharable and searchable, it'd be a great way to have students do collaborative research to develop resources for everyone, and resources that are easily searchable. Other services, like Wikipedia's many projects, offer the same sort of capabilities, but more is always better and the incredible ease and elegant design should make this particul

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GAM3R 7H3ORY

NEWS ANNOUNCEMENT:
The Institute for the Future of the Book is pleased to announce a major networked book experiment with McKenzie Wark, author of A Hacker Manifesto (Harvard 2004). Wark has shared a draft of his next book, GAM3R 7H30RY (Gamer Theory), in an open web-based environment designed to gather feedback and spark discussion. GAM3R 7H30RY 1.1 envisions a new kind of book that evolves over time and brings authors and readers into conversation.

http://www.futureofthebook.org/gamertheory/

In GAM3R 7H30RY, Wark turns his attention to video games, the

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An ARG by the CDC, or sort of

I just finished my first flip through of the new Nintendo Power and I noticed an ad for Verb on the back cover. I know Ian over at WaterCoolerGames had mentioned this before, but I hadn't seen the VERB website until now. The VERB ad states:

Quote:
There are thousands of VERB YELLOWBALLS out there. And just as many ways to pass them on. So find one, do something amazing with it, and blog your story at VERBnow.com

The ad doesn't directly indicate what the point of VERB is, which I think is interesting. It looks like the VERB project is worded in such a way as to get kids curious and to then transform that curiosity into a desire for physical activity. The VERB site itself is very kid-oriented and even has a random idea generator for outdoor games. The CDC also has a page about VERB, describing VERB less playfully as:

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Nintendo Revolution, WII

For those that love or hate Nintendo (I'm in the loving group), their new ad campaign is off to a great start. This page reminds me of classic Apple ads, Pixar animation, and Star Wars with the epic tone of it's text all wrapped up together. I generally see Nintendo as a bundle of the best, so my readings of their ads also tends to be positive. For game studies, the new Nintendo system and the PS3, not to mention the incredible workings of the DS, make this a very exciting time.

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Jane Jacobs' Death

Jane Jacobs, author of The Death and Life of Great American Cities, died yesterday. Many in game studies have cited Lynch's books on urban planning like The Image of the City, but I've seen fewer references to Jane Jacobs' work on urban planning so far. Her work, and its implications, certainly have implications for the growth and development of online spaces, particularly because some of her arguments still counter and complement other design arguments.

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UCLA Hosts Events Focused on Girls and Gaming

On May 8 9, UCLA will host two events focusing on girls' and women's participation in game design and play.

Associate professor Yasmin Kafai from UCLA's Graduate School of Education & Information Studies along with MIT professor Henry Jenkins; Brenda Laurel, chair of the Graduate Media Design Program at the Art Center College of Design, Pasadena, Calif.; Nichol Bradford, global director of strategic growth at Vivendi Universal Games; and a variety of gaming experts from Europe, Asia and North America will participate in "Beyond Barbie and Mortal Kombat: New Perspectives on Gender, Games and Computing," a workshop examining issues of girls and women and computer games.

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