Laurie's blog

blog

Digital Project Pipeline

Many institutions have and are creating digital humanities centers to support the growing needs related to digital humanities research. For local researchers, additional support is always great news. In terms of the larger academic landscape, this is also great news because it means a stronger overall infrastructure for support for research that's interdisciplinary and technically demanding (e.g.; demanding of older computers and machinery, high level computing resources, community critical knowledge mass, etc.).

Continue reading ...

blog

2 years 50 weeks

In checking recent posts, I ended up on my account page on Gameology and found "Member for 2 years 50 weeks" and Zach's shows "2 years 51 weeks". That means we're coming up on a three year anniversary for Gameology! Since Gameology took over the earlier and smaller Academic-Gamers blog it's actually been even longer than three years. Three years for Gameology alone is an impressive tenure especially given videogame studies' general youth as a whole. It's still a bit early, but it's nice to see this anniversary right before the new academic year starts and brings another year of activity for Gameology.

Continue reading ...

blog

Historical Studies of Digital Entertainment Media

From Henry JenkinLowood's blog, the How They Got Game project will be starting up a new journal, Historical Studies of Digital Entertainment Media edited by Matteo Bittanti and Henry Lowood. Historical Studies of Digital Entertainment Media's theme for the first issue will be "Digital Games: Historical and Preservation Studies," and the journal will be openly online, published using the Open Journal System of the Public Knowledge Project. It's always great to see new journals in the field, especially new open access online journals because accessible research can have the most immediate, widest, and greatest impact and use. Continue reading ...

blog

Digital humanities and digital art fellowship positions at HUMlab (4 positions)

Two postdoctoral positions in the digital humanities and two fellowship positions in digital art are now available at HUMlab, Umeå University, Sweden from August 1, 2008 (the actual start date may be later).

The postdoctoral fellowships are one-year positions, with a possible extension of one year. The digital art fellowships are one-year positions. For the postdoc positions, applicants will be expected to have a Ph.D. in a humanities discipline (from a non-Swedish university) and a specialty in any of the following five research areas: participatory media, digital cultural heritage, digital art/architecture, electronic literature, and critical perspectives. For the digital art fellowships, applicants will be expected to have an M.F.A or the equivalent (from a non-Swedish institute/school). In exceptional cases, other areas and backgrounds can be of interest as well.

Continue reading ...

blog

Disruptive Technologies

I've started reading The Innovator's Dilemma after seeing it recommended as a business-based perspective on technological change. Early on, the book has an example of how disruptive innovations are problematic for businesses because they change the business model--costing a great deal to develop and not being saleable to the same market, so they're neglected until it's too late and the old model starts to fail (the historical emergence of personal computers with mainframes vs. personal computers in the early days when some needs could be met by both). While I haven't finished the book (or the follow-up book), I started thinking of game-related innovations that could fit the same model and it seems like the multi-touch-sensitivity of the MacBook Air and the iPhone as well as the other types of user interfaces (Nintendo DS with sound, air and Nintendo Wii with movement) are the best current examples of what's to come (or at least the best examples related to my interests since narrative, complexity, personalization, procedurality, and many other areas are also developing rapidly).

Continue reading ...

blog

Visiting Assistant Professor in Professional Writing

Visiting Assistant Professor in Professional Writing Position, U of Central Florida, Department of English, PO Box 161346 Orlando FL 32816

The Department of English at the University of Central Florida seeks a Visiting Assistant Professor specializing in Professional Writing to be employed at our Southern region campus. The non-tenure track position requires a PhD in English, Rhetoric/Composition, or a related field with specialization in technical and/or professional communication from an accredited institution and the ability to teach undergraduate and graduate courses. Position begins August 2008. Teaching load is 4/4. Possible assignments will include courses in our online Graduate Certificate in Professional Writing and our online M.A. in Technical Communication as well as our undergraduate professional writing and technical communication courses. Face-to-face courses and office hours will be primarily on UCF's Southern region campus in Cocoa. Must have expertise in developing and teaching web-based courses or be willing to teach online after receiving training on campus.

Continue reading ...

blog

Gameology on Twitter

A few Gameology folks are on Twitter. Thus far, I've found Zach and Matt B., and I'm on it too, but I'll be looking to find others, and hopefully those not on will join. I'd previously abstained from microblogging/twittering because I thought it was too short and quick to be as useful as I wanted, but it's all I have time for lately and that makes it much more useful than the alternative. Plus, it's fun right now and anything fun is especially nice at the end of the semester and with the ever-rising heat of summer. It's more fun with more people so those with the time should join and follow their Gameology friends.

Continue reading ...

blog

Special Interest Group at CCCC in New Orleans on "Serious Games"

Cynthia Haynes and Jan Holmevik are hosting a Special Interest Group at CCCC in New Orleans on "Serious Games,"
Session: FSIG.22 on Apr 4, 2008 from 6:30 PM to 7:30 PM. Details on the session are:

This special interest group will focus on the study and application of serious games relative to communication, rhetoric, and creative expression. 'Serious games' is defined by a variety of game platforms, designs, and purposes. While the obvious 'serious' application of games is for education (and training), many games are studied rhetorically as a means of critiquing broader cultural phenomena. Thus, this SIG is designed to concern both theoretical and practical aspects of 'serious games,' and build a community of rhetoric and composition game studies scholars, designers, and users. As a new SIG, we aim to build this community through collaborative and open source social technologies that support both game play and enable teaching and communication practices. Our combined experience with such systems over the past 13 years, and our connections with both U.S. and international game studies scholars and journals gives us an important basis for forming this group. We developed Lingua MOO in 1995 and the enCore system on which many MOOs are still based. Most recently, we have organized the Serious Games Colloquium of the new Rhetoric, Communication, and Information Design PhD program at Clemson University (Directed by Victor Vitanza). And we recently spent a year teaching in the Computer Game studies research center at IT University of Copenhagen, Denmark. We are also on the editorial board of both Game Studies e-journal and the Sage Publication journal, Games and Culture. We plan to form this SIG as a research collective studying various serious games such as America's Army, Second Life, World of Warcraft, and other massively multi-player games.

Continue reading ...

blog

Fatworld

Fatworld has been released! I've been waiting for this and then I missed the release date. In case anyone else missed it as well, check it out. The "weighty topics" page on the Fatworld website even lists one of my favorite publications, the Nutrition Action Healthletter from the Center for Science in the Public Interest (which has great information and a "food porn" item in each issue). Read through the Fatworld site, check out the game, or see Watercoolergames for more on the release.

Continue reading ...

blog

When is emulation enough?

In working with digital library concerns, one of the biggest current issues is digital preservation. The strategies for digital preservation tend to be standardization and validation for the initial form and then either migration or emulation to keep that initial work usable. I'm not sure how the Library of Congress' digital game preservation is designed, but does anyone know if it's designed the same way with a focus on migration or emulation? If so, are the game systems themselves also being saved for researchers? If only some are or simply accepting that current preservation isn't comprehensive, when is emulation enough for most game studies researchers?

Continue reading ...
Syndicate content